KISS - Keep It Simple Story

Grant Leboff, chief executive of Sticky Marketing, talks generating content, attention deficit and the need for simplicity in marketing We now live in a world where everyone has a channel. Traditional media companies are still producing radio, cinema, TV, newspapers and magazines etc. Meanwhile, all businesses are generating content in order to utilise their own media. From websites and blogs to social platforms, companies have inadvertently become media businesses themselves. Finally, individuals have also become mini media entities. From sharing moments on Instagram, to thoughts on Facebook and Twitter, or business ideas on LinkedIn, every individual is now producing their own content that is shared in the public arena. The result is that we live in an age where information is abundant. In fact, most people are overwhelmed by the amount of material available on any given subject. Everything in life has a cause and effect. Nothing exists in a vacuum. The direct result of the abundance of information is that we now live in a world where attention is scarce. It is harder today to capture people’s attention than ever before. Of course, in order for your event to be successful you need both your prospect’s and your customer’s attention. Without it, they will not even know about your show, never mind attend. This has important ramifications for the messaging around your event. Firstly, you need to keep the value proposition simple. Of course, many events are multi faceted with a variety of angles and areas of interest for the visitor. However, if you cannot distil the value proposition down to a few words, or a sentence, then it is unlikely to cut through the noise in the market place. We see evidence of the need for simplicity all around us. For example, Coca-Cola used to market each of its cola products separately. So Coca-Cola, Diet Coke, Coke Zero and Coca-Cola Life were each treated as separate products. However, Coca Cola have now opted for a single brand approach. This is where Coca-Cola - the brand - is promoted, with the original drink, Diet Coke, Coke Zero and Coca-Cola Life all being treated as varieties of the one brand. Consequently, the packaging has now changed so it is more cohesive between products, and the communications reflect this. Ultimately, in a world of noise it is easier to cut through with a single brand proposition than four separate products. Similarly, the success of supermarkets such as Aldi show that for many customers ‘less is more’. While the shopping experience at so many of its competitors is simply overwhelming, for many customers, Aldi’s proposition is refreshingly simple. The point should not be lost when promoting events. The event itself may include many dimensions and experiences, but the value proposition has to be articulated clearly and concisely. Too often event organisers are so keen to impart the plethora of offerings available, that the customer has no idea if there is a compelling reason to attend at all. Once the value proposition has been defined the next step is how that is communicated. Event organisers need to ask ‘what is their narrative?’ In other words, what is the story that will capture your customer’s imagination regarding the event? Stories are more memorable than plain facts. In a world of attention deficit, having a narrative behind the event makes it more likely that people will remember what the show is about, and why they should attend. Moreover, stories have the ability to capture the imagination in a way that facts and benefits never will. People are more likely to accept ideas within the context of a story, than when in an analytical mode just absorbing details. This is because stories appeal to the emotional side of our thinking, not only the rational logical brain and in a world where everyone has a channel, your best marketers are your engaged customers and prospects. They are more likely to share content that touches them emotionally, than mere facts and figures. Event organisers need to think of the digital platforms today, from websites and blogs to YouTube, Instagram, Vine and Facebook, as opportunities to communicate simple stories. In the old world, the acronym ‘KISS’, that originally came out of the field of design engineering, was adopted in sales and marketing to remind individuals to ‘keep it simple stupid’; in other words, not to overcomplicate the message as customers were less likely to ‘get it’ in the few moments you had. Today, it might be more apt to think of ‘KISS’ as keep it simple story. In other words, a simple value proposition together with a compelling narrative is the recipe for effective communications.Grant Leboff is CEO of stickymarketing.com He is an international speaker and best selling author. His current book is entitled Stickier Marketing. This article was first published in the August issue of EN. Any comments? Email Jamie Wallis
Guest Author
Posted by Guest Author
PopularComments
Twitter Facebook Google+ LinkedIn

Related Stories

Others on EN

Opportunity knocks

Opportunity knocks

Paul Byrom, AEO chairman and MD at Upper Street Events on the formation and goals of the new AEO Development Board
The height of safe practice

The height of safe practice

Andrew Harrison, ESSA director on continuing to build a robust, safety-first, working culture in events and exhibitions.
All part of the plan

All part of the plan

Kevin Horler, project director of Vividfish Ltd, on the importance of creating an inbound marketing strategy for your next exhibition.

WATCH THE EN AWARDS 2016 HIGHLIGHTS


silverstream.tv

Most Read Stories

Lourda Derry: Making the connection

Lourda Derry: Making the connection

Lourda Derry, director of Easyfairs UK addresses the science behind operations and the profile of our audiences.
Steve Monnington: The Dealmaker in March

Steve Monnington: The Dealmaker in March

Steve Monnington of Mayfield Media Strategies, runs the rule over the latest global exhibition deals.
Helen Lowe: Marketing déjà vu

Helen Lowe: Marketing déjà vu

Helen Lowe, events and marketing manager at Europa International, talks about the importance of keeping up with the creativity amidst the chaos.

Latest News

EN spotlights #eventtech start-ups with new competition

EN spotlights #eventtech start-ups with new competition

EN has teamed up with Event Tech Lab and EventTech 17 to launch a competition to help #eventtech start-ups get more exposure in the events industry.
Reed acquires Imbibe Media

Reed acquires Imbibe Media

Reed Exhibitions has announced that it has acquired Imbibe Media, the company behind B2B drinks industry show Imbibe Live.
Celtic Manor convention centre construction to commence in February

Celtic Manor convention centre construction to commence in February

Construction of the International Convention Centre at the Celtic Manor Resort near Newport is to get under way next February, according to chief executive of the Celtic Manor Ian Edwards.

Latest Features

Fund-raising the bar

Fund-raising the bar

Five venues from around the UK give EN the lowdown on the work they have done with charities in 2016.
New kid on the block

New kid on the block

Stuart Johnston discovers the world of exhibitions in his new Ascential role.
The big picture

The big picture

Imagine you could find all the photos taken at your event...well now you can, says Gaggletag founder Gideon Summerfield.

Latest Galleries

ESSA 2016 Conference of Things

ESSA 2016 Conference of Things

This year’s ESSA Conference achieved a record attendance of delegates from across the events supplier industry, representing over 100 companies at Ricoh Arena, on 24 November.
The Prosthetics Event 2016

The Prosthetics Event 2016

Exhibition, education and shopping show The Prosthetics Event, returned to Conference Aston in Birmingham for the third consecutive year on 19 November.
World Travel Market London 2016

World Travel Market London 2016

World Travel Market (WTM) London 2016, which took place on 7-9 November at ExCeL London, celebrated its most successful show yet with a joint record attendance of 51,500.